The 24 Best-Paying Entry-Level Jobs To Boost Your Career

Whether you’ve just finished a college degree or you’re looking for a career change, finding a well-paying entry-level job can be challenging. While there are countless entry-level jobs, many companies don’t pay well for these positions because entry-level jobs don’t usually require much responsibility or experience.

In fact, employers often think they are doing people a favor by hiring them in entry-level positions, and so tend to pay them less.

Despite this, some companies are willing to pay their entry-level employees well. Additionally, certain entry-level positions pay better than others. If you’re searching for an entry-level job or are still researching your options, the following guide on best-paying entry-level jobs should help you kickstart your career.

Defining An Entry-Level Job

Most people understand that an entry-level job is a position that requires little to no experience. Instead, the employer provides on-the-job training to get you up to speed.

In addition, entry-level jobs tend to pay less than more senior positions. This is because the company is taking on more training responsibility, so are not willing to pay as much. Additionally, entry-level employees usually don’t have as much responsibility as their more experienced counterparts, and so are compensated as such.

However, there are exceptions to the rule. For example, some companies are willing to pay their entry-level employees well. Not to mention, some entry-level jobs require a degree or further education, and thus are better paying than others. That being said, there are a few things to look for when searching for an entry level job.

What To Look For When Researching Entry-Level Jobs

Although there are many entry-level jobs out there, finding the right one for you can be a challenge if you don’t know where to start. Before applying to entry-level positions left and right, research the types of entry-level jobs available in your area. The following are a few crucial factors to consider when researching an entry-level job:

1. Does the field interest you?

If you’re looking for an entry-level job, it’s essential to find one in a field that interests you. The goal of an entry-level job should be to gain the necessary experience to move up into a higher-paying position in the future. If you don’t find something that interests you, it’ll be harder to stay inspired and motivated to do the job.

2. Are there any educational requirements?

Most entry-level jobs won’t require experience, but they may have certain educational requirements. For example, if you’re looking for an entry-level job in a medical field, then it’s likely you will need to have a related degree to qualify.

With that in mind, research the educational requirements for each entry-level job that interests you. If you have a degree, look for jobs where your degree matches the job requirements.

3. What is the compensation like?

Although many entry-level jobs don’t pay well, some do. As such, there’s no need to settle for a low-paying entry-level position, especially if you have a college degree. When researching entry-level positions, look at the average pay rate as well as the range to get an idea of what you could expect.

4. What is the job outlook like?

Finally, it’s important to research the job outlook for any entry-level position you’re considering. The last thing you want is to invest your time and energy into a job only to find that the market is saturated or the field isn’t growing. Researching the job outlook will help ensure that you find a job with room for growth and advancement.

Keeping these things in mind, the following are 24 of the best-paying entry-level jobs out there that can kickstart your career:

1. Marketing Associate

Marketing associates assist with the planning and execution of marketing campaigns. Their tasks can involve conducting market research, developing marketing materials, managing social media accounts, and more. Marketing associates also often provide administrative support to marketing teams, such as scheduling meetings, performing data entry, and answering emails.

Most marketing associate positions require a bachelor’s degree in marketing or a related field.

However, some companies may be willing to hire candidates with less experience or education if they have relevant skills. For example, candidates with experience in graphic design or social media may be able to qualify for a marketing associate position without a formal marketing degree.

In general, marketing associates need verbal and written communication skills, computer proficiency, analytical skills, and organization skills.

2. Social Media Manager

Social media managers help create and manage social media content. This responsibility can involve developing strategies to grow a company’s social media following, creating and posting engaging content, monitoring social media accounts for comments and messages, and more. Social media managers also often handle customer service inquiries that come through social media.

A bachelor’s degree in marketing, communications, or business is typically required. However, you might qualify if you have relevant experience using social media for business purposes.

For example, if you’ve managed social media accounts for a personal blog or small business in the past, then you may already have the skills and experience needed to be a successful social media manager.

Additionally, social media managers typically need to have strong communication and writing skills. They should also be familiar with various social media platforms and understand how to use them for marketing purposes.

3. IT Business Analyst

IT business analysts assess the needs of a company and develop solutions to improve efficiency. Their tasks include conducting research, developing process improvements, creating documentation, and more. IT business analysts also often train employees to use new systems or software.

IT business analyst positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field, such as management information systems. However, you might be able to qualify with relevant experience or certification.

For example, if you have experience working at a help desk or in a support role, then you may have the skills and knowledge needed to be a successful IT business analyst. IT business analysts typically need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be able to communicate effectively with both technical and non-technical staff.

4. Investment Associate

Investment associates conduct research and analysis to support investment decisions. Their responsibilities can involve researching companies, industries, and market trends, developing financial models, and more. Investment associates also often provide administrative support to investment teams.

Investment associate positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in finance or a related field. However, you might be able to qualify with relevant experience or certification. Additionally, investment associates need to have strong analytical and research skills. They should also communicate effectively and work well in a team environment.

5. Paralegal

Paralegals provide support to lawyers. This support can involve doing research, preparing documents, managing cases, and more. Paralegals also often handle administrative tasks, such as scheduling appointments and maintaining records.

Paralegal positions typically require an associate’s degree in paralegal studies or a related field. However, you might be able to qualify with relevant experience or certification. For example, if you have experience working in a law office or have taken some college courses in legal studies, you may be able to qualify for a paralegal position.

Likewise, if you’ve worked as a legal secretary or administrative assistant, then you may already have the necessary skills and experience. Paralegals need to have strong research and writing skills. They should also be detail-oriented and organized.

6. Human Resource Associate

A human resource associate is responsible for supporting the human resources department. This can involve research, preparing documents, assisting with employee relations issues, and more.

Human resource associates also often handle administrative tasks, such as maintaining employee records and updating databases. Human resource associate positions are available in various industries, including healthcare, government, education, and more.

Human resource associate positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in human resources or a related field, such as business administration, but other degrees or qualifications may be applicable too. Additionally, human resource associates need to have strong research and writing skills. They should also be detail-oriented and organized.

7. Sales Development Representative

Sales development representatives help generate leads and set up appointments for sales staff. Their tasks may involve conducting market research, using various lead generation tools, and more. Sales development representatives may also provide administrative support to sales teams, such as preparing reports and maintaining records.

Sales development representative positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in marketing or a related field, such as business administration. You might be able to qualify for a position as a sales development rep if you have previous experience working in sales or marketing.

Additionally, sales development representatives must be proficient in using various lead generation tools and software, such as customer relationship management (CRM) systems. Sales development representatives should also have good research and writing skills.

8. Copywriter

Copywriters have to write compelling marketing and advertising copy. This can involve crafting headlines, creating taglines, writing ad copy, and more. In addition, copywriters often work with art directors to create visually appealing ads that are also effective at selling products or services.

Copywriter positions are available in various industries, such as advertising, marketing, and publishing.

Copywriter positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in English, journalism, communication, marketing, or other related fields. However, you may be able to qualify for a position with relevant experience (such as freelance writing experience) or a portfolio of writing samples.

Additionally, copywriters need to have good research and writing skills. They should also be creative and can come up with new and innovative ideas.

9. Database Analyst

Database analysts are responsible for designing, developing, and maintaining databases. This can involve checking the accuracy and integrity of data, developing database security measures, and more. Database analysts also often support users by troubleshooting issues or offering training sessions on various topics.

Database analysts are needed in many different industries, including healthcare, government, finance, and more.

Database analyst positions typically require a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information systems, or other related fields. Additionally, database analysts need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be proficient in various database software, such as SQL.

10. Sales Representative

Sales representatives sell products or services to customers. The job can involve conducting market research, making sales presentations, negotiating contracts, and more. Sales representatives may work in various industries, such as retail, healthcare, technology, automotives, and more.

Most sales representative positions require at least a high school diploma.

However, some sales positions may require a bachelor’s degree, especially if you sell complex products or services. For example, pharmaceutical sales representative positions typically need a bachelor’s degree in a science-related field. Sales representatives need to have strong communication and interpersonal skills. They should also be persistent and be able to handle rejection.

11. Financial Analyst

Financial analysts provide financial analysis and advice to businesses and individuals. This can involve analyzing financial statements, evaluating investment opportunities, and more. Financial analysts are needed in various industries, such as banking, accounting, and consulting.

A bachelor’s degree in economics, finance, accounting, or another related field is typically required for any entry-level financial analyst position. Financial analysts may also need to be certified as a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA).

Additionally, financial analysts need to have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be proficient in financial software – at the very minimum, they should be familiar with Excel.

12. Registered Nurse

Registered nurses (RNs) provide care and support to patients. They may work in various settings, such as hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, and more. RNs can also specialize in a certain area of nursing, such as pediatric nursing or geriatric nursing.

To become an RN, you’ll need to complete an accredited nursing program, get an associate degree in nursing, or get a nursing bachelor’s degree. You’ll also need to get a license from your state’s board of nursing once you earn your degree.

Finally, once you get your nursing license, you’ll need to pass the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). As nursing can be physically and emotionally challenging, RNs should be able to handle stress well. They also need to have strong communication and interpersonal skills.

13. Dental Hygienist

Dental hygienists clean teeth and provide other preventive dental care. They may also take X-rays, apply fluoride treatments, and more. Dental hygienists typically work in dental offices, although they may also work in other settings, such as schools or prisons.

You will need to finish an accredited dental hygiene program to become a dental hygienist. Once you earn a degree, you’ll have to pass the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE).

After that, you’ll need to pass a state or regional licensure examination. Dental hygienists need to have strong communication and interpersonal skills. They should also be detail-oriented and have good hand-eye coordination.

14. Mortgage Assistant

Mortgage assistants work in the mortgage industry. They typically work for banks, credit unions, or mortgage companies. Mortgage assistants help loan officers with various tasks, such as processing loan applications and gathering documentation.

Most mortgage assistant positions generally only require a high school diploma. However, some employers prefer candidates with an associate degree or some college coursework. In addition, mortgage assistants should have strong communication and organizational skills.

15. Accountant

There are many kinds of accountants, but they all share one common goal: to ensure that their clients’ financial records are not only accurate, but also compliant with relevant laws and regulations.

They may also be responsible for preparing tax returns, auditing financial statements, and providing advice to clients. Accountants may work in public accounting firms, corporations, nonprofits, or government agencies.

Most accountant positions require a bachelor’s degree in accounting. However, it’s worth noting that some employers may prefer candidates with a master’s degree in accounting or a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) license. Accountants should have strong analytical and problem-solving skills, not to mention the ability to do complex math.

They should also be familiar with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). In addition, general accountants should be able to use various accounting software programs, such as QuickBooks and Microsoft Excel. Finally, accountants should also be detail-oriented and able to work well under pressure.

16. Executive Assistant

An executive assistant provides administrative and secretarial support to an executive or group of executives. Although they pay well, it’s worth noting that the growth of these positions is declining. This is in part because many executives aren’t nearly as dependent on an assistant to do their job as they once were – they are becoming increasingly self-sufficient and tech-savvy in their own right.

If anything, most executives today share an assistant with other executives instead of having one to themselves.

Executive assistants may work in various settings, such as corporate offices, government agencies, or nonprofit organizations. Executive assistants have a wide range of responsibilities, including managing calendars, scheduling appointments, preparing correspondence, handling financial matters, and more.

Most executive assistant positions require at least a high school diploma.

However, some employers may only consider candidates with an associate degree or some college coursework. Executive assistants should have strong communication and interpersonal skills and excellent organizational skills. They should also be able to handle confidential information discreetly and be proficient in using office equipment and software, such as Microsoft Office.

17. Web Developer

Web developers design and create websites. They are also responsible for how the site looks and works. There is an enormous demand for web developers because new companies emerge constantly – and all businesses, no matter how big or small, need a website. As such, the job outlook for web developers is much higher than for other positions.

Web developers typically have a bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field. However, some employers may require a degree in the field or some college coursework. It is worth noting that there are self-taught web developers as well, many of whom work as freelancers. If you have a portfolio of work, that can be just as impressive to potential employers.

In terms of skills, web developers should have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be able to code in various programming languages, such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Familiarity with content management systems (CMS) is also helpful.

Finally, web developers should be able to work well with others, as they often collaborate with web designers, copywriters, and other professionals to create a finished website.

18. Environmental Engineer

Environmental engineers work to protect the environment. They develop and implement plans to clean up polluted areas, prevent pollution, and reduce waste. Environmental engineers may work in various settings, such as government agencies, consulting firms, or private companies.

Most environmental engineer positions require at least a bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering. However, some employers prefer job candidates with a master’s degree or a Professional Engineer (PE) license.

Environmental engineers should have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be familiar with various environmental regulations and have the ability to develop plans that meet those regulations.

Finally, environmental engineers should be able to work well with others, as they often collaborate with other professionals, such as scientists, to create effective solutions.

19. User Experience Designer

User experience designers are responsible for the overall look, feel, and functionality of a website or app. They work to create a user-friendly experience that is both aesthetically appealing and easy to navigate. User experience designers typically have a bachelor’s degree in computer science. Some additional qualifiers are also beneficial, such as the Certified User Experience Professional (CUXP) certification.

User experience designers should have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They should also be familiar with various design software programs, such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. User experience designers should also have a good understanding of how users engage with websites and apps.

20. Content Strategist

A content strategist is someone that helps create, manage, and oversee website content. They ensure that the content on the website is high quality, relevant, and engaging. A content strategist typically has a bachelor’s degree in English, communication, or a related field, such as journalism or marketing.

A content strategist must be creative and be able to come up with new ideas for content. They must be able to write well and edit their own work.

In addition, a content strategist must work well with others, as they often collaborate with web developers, designers, copywriters, and other professionals to create a complete website. They must also understand Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and general content marketing principles.

21. Software Developer

A software developer creates, tests, and maintains software applications. Companies are building their own customer-facing applications more and more, which is why there’s such a high demand for software developers.

Software developers can work in many settings, such as corporations, government agencies, or small businesses. Most software developer positions require at least a bachelor’s degree in computer science. However, some companies will prefer candidates with a master’s degree or experience in a specific programming language.

Software developers should have strong analytical and problem-solving skills. They also need to be familiar with certain programming languages; for example, Java, C++, and Python.

In addition, software developers must be capable of working in teams since they often collaborate with other professionals (such as web developers and computer scientists) to develop effective software solutions.

22. Law Clerk

A law clerk is someone who provides support to lawyers and judges. They may be responsible for researching cases, writing legal briefs, and preparing documents for court hearings. Law clerks typically have a bachelor’s degree in pre-law or a related field, such as political science or history. In some cases, a law clerk may have a Juris Doctor (JD) degree.

In terms of skills, law clerks should have excellent research and writing skills. They should also be familiar with legal terminology and procedures. In addition, law clerks need to work well under pressure and meet deadlines.

23. Medical Receptionist

A medical receptionist is responsible for managing patient appointments, answering phone calls, and handling other administrative tasks in a medical office. They may also be responsible for verifying insurance benefits and collecting copayments.

There are various settings in which medical receptionists can work, such as hospitals, clinics, and private practices. The demand for medical receptionists is predicted to remain stable well into the future.

Medical receptionists typically have a high school diploma or equivalent. Some medical receptionists may have post-secondary education, such as a certificate or associate degree. Medical receptionists should have excellent customer service and communication skills.

They should also be familiar with medical terminology and office procedures. In addition, medical receptionists should be able to use various computer programs, such as scheduling software and electronic health records (EHR) systems.

24. Legal Document Coder

Legal document coders are responsible for organizing and coding legal documents. They may also be responsible for maintaining databases, preparing reports, and providing support to lawyers and paralegals. Legal document coders commonly work in government agencies, law firms, and corporate legal departments.

Most legal document coding positions require at least an associate degree in legal studies or a related field. Legal document coders should have strong research and writing skills. They should also be familiar with legal terminology and procedures.

In addition, legal document coders should be able to use various coding systems, such as The American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) and The Bluebook.

Where To Find High-Paying Entry-Level Jobs

There are plenty of places you can look for high-paying entry-level jobs. One option is to search on job boards or online job search engines, such as Indeed, Monster, or CareerBuilder.

You can also contact employment service providers, such as O2 Employment. We specialize in connecting job seekers with great employment opportunities. We work with a variety of businesses, from small startups to large corporations.

Another option is to network with people working in your field of interest and ask if they know of any open positions. Finally, you can check the websites of specific companies to see if they have any entry-level openings.

Create A Stellar Resume To Find A High-Paying Entry-Level Job

It can be a challenge to find an entry-level position that pays well. However, they are out there. This list of entry-level positions is a great place to start your job search. With the right qualifications and a little bit of research, you can find an entry-level job that will help you start your career on the right foot.

To improve your chances of getting an entry-level job, be sure to create a sleek and professional resume. Because you can’t rely on past job positions to demonstrate your experience, you’ll need to make sure that you showcase your skills and qualifications in the best way possible.

To do this, you’ll want to focus on creating a resume that is clear, concise, and easy to read. You’ll also want to highlight your relevant skills and experiences, as well as any awards or accolades you may have received. By focusing on writing a great resume, you’ll have a much better chance of landing an entry-level job that pays well.